Getting the best gaming mouse will sure improve your performance and gaming experience through your daily adventures on games. A gaming mouse can be the final piece in your great PC rig to help you reach a whole new level of your gaming performance potential.

Some gaming mouses are more expensive, and of course, that doesn’t mean it’s always better. For example, a lot of gaming mouses with perfect shapes and incredible design, have terrible specs, like laser sensors, low-quality buttons, and they are very expensive.

The list below will help you find what’s best for you, comparing specs, features, and of course considering quality, ergonomy, and budget.

Best FPS Gaming Mouses

FPS games require a good gaming mouse, with great accuracy, flow, and comfort. Your precision and quick reaction are what FPS games demand from you to be good, so it’s very important to find a gaming mouse that fits your motion exactly.

Razer DeathAdder Elite

Razer DeathAdder Elite, Wired Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 16000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 7
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 127 x 70 x 44 mm
Weight: 105 g
Price: $59.99

The original DeathAdder was released in 2006, and over the years was one of the most popular gaming mouses, being gamers’ first choice, for any type of game genre. In 2016, an update came, releasing the DeathAdder Elite. Currently at the price of $59.99, the all-purpose gaming mouse, offers an ergonomic design and RGB lighting, and a total of seven buttons.

The peripheral is 127 x 70 x 44 mm in size and ergonomically contoured on both sides, having textured grips for both the thumb and the outermost two fingers. DeathAdder Elite has a clickable scroll wheel, a left button, a right button, two thumb buttons and two beneath the scroll wheel.

Razer Synapse 2.0 will be your “best buddy” during your daily use with the Razer DeathAdder Elite. The software interface lets you program buttons, create profiles of settings and link them with games, change the RGB lighting, calibrate the mouse for different surfaces, and adjust the DPI from 100 up to 16,000. As for the optical sensor, the Deathadder Elite has its version, based on the PMW-3389 developed by sensor company Pixart, with a 99.4% resolution accuracy and a 450 IPS rating.

SteelSeries Rival 600

SteelSeries Rival 600, Wired Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 12000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 7
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 131 x 62 x 27 mm
Weight: 96 g / Customizable up to 128 g
Price:
$79.99

One of the best mouses SteelSeries has made is the Rival 600. Its new TrueMove 3+ sensor, slick design, and the fully customizable weight system are what makes this gaming mouse stand out among the others.

It has a delicate body, with a soft finish that doesn’t pick up oil, a silicon side grip, and a total number of 7 buttons with large left and right button. The most unique and innovative feature of the Rival 600 is the customizable weight system. It contains eight cubes weighing 4g each, that can be used to customize the weight of the Rival 600. Simply detach the magnetic panels on the sides of the mouse, front and back, and add as many weights as you want. There are 256 different weight combinations, allowing for a range of 96g to 128g total.

The Rival 600 can be set at up to 12,000 DPI. It packs not one, but two sensors. The first one is a standard Pixart sensor, while the other is exclusively for lift-off distance, letting the mouse stop on a dime if you lift the mouse as little as 0.5mm. You can calibrate the two sensors to your surface by holding down the DPI switch, and the LOD can be adjusted as high as 2mm if you’d like. The Rival 600 also runs on SteelSeries Engine 3.11.10, for Windows (7 or newer) and Mac OSX (10.8 or newer).

HyperX Pulsefire FPS Pro

HyperX Pulsefire FPS Pro, Wired Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 16000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 6
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 71 x 128 x 42 mm
Weight: 95 g
Price:
$59.99

The HyperX PulseFire FPS Pro is a mouse aimed squarely at gamers, particularly in shooters, hence “first-person shooter (FPS)” in the name. HyperX has a growing range of mouse options for PC gamers, with the PulseFire FPS Pro hitting the scene a few months ago. It sports an ergonomic design with some industrial inspiration, complete with RBG lighting and other features gamers might enjoy.

HyperX has enlisted a Pixart 3389 sensor with a DPI of up to 16,000, with a one-millisecond polling rate. The sensor is supremely accurate, responding nicely to rapid movements. It also has a highly flexible braided cable, ensuring cable tautness won’t impede your movements. Many other thoughtful design decisions coalesce to make the PulseFire Pro a great gaming mouse, well worth the price of admission.

The mouse has a metallic-like finish, made of plastic, including rubberized grips with an industrial durbar pattern, which is a nice touch. The ergonomics of the mouse are spot-on, with tactile buttons and a DPI alternator button that is embedded slightly into the mouse, to prevent accidental DPI alterations. Large, smooth mouse-skates on the underside ensure support for rapid movements and easy cleaning.

Best MMO Gaming Mouses

If you are in search of an MMO gaming mouse, it is important to consider quality and comfort. You can find below the mouses we found, with great build quality, affordable prices and ergonomic at hand.

Cooler Master MM830

Cooler Master MM830, Wired/Wireless Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 24,000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 8
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 82.2 x 130.1 x 43.4 mm
Weight: 162 g
Price:
$59.99

Cooler Master brings its first MMO gaming mouse on the market, designed perfectly to compete against others, like Steelseries Rival 600 and Logitech G502 Hero. Unlike its tag “MMO mouse”, and designed for “gamers”, it is an undoubtedly good all-purpose mouse, that can be used for browsing, work, and every game genre.

At the price of $59,99, it offers an optical sensor up to 24,000 DPI, 8 programmable buttons, a “precision” scroll wheel, as they call it, RGB lighting that can be configured with the proprietary software, and the whole body is made of plastic.

It features a couple of pretty unique features, including a D-pad and a customizable 96×24 OLED display. The D-pad is integrated into the left side grip, and Cooler Master thinks that these will be easier to navigate than the unwieldy collection of buttons found on many MMO mice. The OLED display can add an extra degree of personalization to the mouse, and it can display anything from your statistics to custom clan emblems and system information.

To change your mouse settings, you can use the Cooler Master’s Portal software, where you can create and save profiles of sets, tune your DPI Settings in 100 DPI increments, control the RGB lighting, adjust your polling rate, and set button response time.

Corsair Scimitar Pro RGB

Corsair Scimitar Pro RGB, Wired Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 16000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 17
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 119 x 77 x 48 mm
Weight: 147 g
Price:
$59.99

The pro version of Scimitar RGB has been arranged to give ou accurate movements, high speed, as well as double-digit re-mappable buttons for exceptional levels of use and function, with a well-built and corded USB gaming mouse that meets and exceeds all your needs and expectations.

The Scimitar RGB Pro mouse improves your gaming sessions with custom 16,000 DPI optical sensors. It also features onboard profile storage plus hardware macro-playback. The device has a pro-proven Key Slider macro-button management system for the ultimate gaming experience.

It features 12-mechanical side buttons with an exclusive key slider system, where you can fine-tune the position of buttons up to 8 millimeters and lock these securely in place with the patent-pending macro-control system. This feature allows you to keep each key within your reach for a customized and comfortable play style. As for the textured side button caps, it gives you better grip and consistent precision control.

Button-controlled DPI switching was introduced to the device, allowing you to trigger dpi on the Scimitar RGB Pro itself. You can tune the mouse to your mousepad surface for adequate sensor-precision, as well as responsiveness.

Razer Naga Trinity

Razer Naga Trinity, Gaming Wired Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 16000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 19
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 119 x 74 x 43 mm
Weight: 118 g
Price:
$99.99

At the price of $99.99, the Razer Naga Trinity might seem expensive to some, but the 5G mouse sensor and interchangeable side plates make this a very versatile gaming mouse. Ultimately, if you play a lot of MMO’s or MOBA’s, you’re getting a lot of mouse for your money – especially if you switch between genres regularly.

One of the biggest selling points of the Razer Naga Trinity over the previous Naga iterations is the fact that you can change the side plate depending on the game you’re about to play or the task you need to perform. It features a 12-button layout that can be used on MMO’s, a traditional 2-button layout for FPS gaming, and a MOBA-themed layout with 7 buttons.

The 5G optical sensor on its own offers a stunning maximum sensitivity of 16,000 counts-per-inch (CPI) which means that you’ll never need to worry about looking down at your mouse angrily in the middle of a raid because your mouse isn’t performing up to snuff.

Even though it doesn’t feature the ability to fully customize the lighting on each zone of the mouse, like some other high-end gaming mice, the Razer Naga Trinity does feature RGB lighting, and the little customization that it is capable of is intuitive enough through Razer’s Synapse software.

Best Wireless Gaming Mouses

Wireless interfaces often suffer from input lag and wireless mouses can cause a headache on your daily use. But fear not, we found the best wireless mouses for web browsing, work, and of course, gaming!

Logitech G Pro Wireless

Logitech G Pro, Wireless Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 16000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB / Wireless
Buttons: 7
Ergonomic: Ambidextrous
Size: 125 x 63 x 40 mm
Weight: 80 g
Price:
$149.99

At just 80g it’s one of the lightest mice on the market, if not the lightest overall. This theoretically allows for faster mouse movement, and also makes it easier to pick up and flick around. To put it into context, the Razer Mamba Wireless is 106g, and a wired mouse like the Logitech G502 goes all the way up to 121g.

It’s an ambidextrous mouse, and Logitech allows for side buttons on either side or none at all. In the box there’s two extra buttons and two extra placeholders, should you decide to remove all the buttons. The buttons are held in place with magnets and are a snap to remove and swap out.

The mouse has a fairly low profile design, so it isn’t intended for people who want to have a big mouse squarely in their palm. The entire mouse features smooth black plastic and none of it is textured at all, which I did not like as I prefer some extra grip on the sides. If you’re the type of gamer who shies away from ambidextrous mouses, there’s nothing to worry about here. As far as its battery life goes, it’s really good.

Logitech’s Gaming Software was already one of the best mouses available for peripheral customization, but the company has one-upped itself with its all-new G Hub software suite. It is easy to use, logically organized, and straightforward enough that anyone can use it. You can do all the normal stuff here including adjusting DPI settings (up to five settings are allowed, but you can have as little as two), changing the lighting, recording and assigning macros, and much, much more.

SteelSeries Rival 650

SteelSeries Rival 650, Wireless Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 12000
Sensor: Dual Optical
Interface: USB / Wireless
Buttons: 7
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 128 x 68 x 42 mm
Weight: 121 g / Customizable up to 153 g
Price:
$119.99

The Rival 650 is visually indistinguishable from its predecessor in almost all ways. The difference is that there’s no cable coming out the front. Instead, the front has a recessed micro-USB port for plugging in the charging cable.

On the left side, there are three slim thumb buttons. While each offers a solid feel, their placement is slightly off. We find only the closest back button is easily accessible. At 121 grams, the Rival 650 offers a nice heft in the hand, and it can be customized by popping off each side and slotting in up to 32 grams extra weight (in 4-gram increments).

From the outset, setting up the Rival 650 is easy with the SteelSeries Engine software. The program even points out computer settings that could impact the mouse’s effectiveness in games. That said, the Rival 650 only switches between two CPI settings per profile, which feels like too few.

The Quantum Wireless connection the company developed lives up to the demand for serious gaming. It delivers a 1,000Hz polling rate, and we don’t notice any hitches. We even play with the considerable potential for interference, with a smartwatch on and a Wi-Fi-connected smartphone right next to the dongle. It never flinched.

And, that wireless connection delivers all the performance of the TrueMove 3+ sensor. That’s up to 12,000 CPI with one-to-one tracking up to 3,500 CPI, and customizable lift-off detection between 0.5mm and 2mm. The sensor can handle intense speeds over 350 IPS and accelerations up to 50G.

Best Left-handed Gaming Mouse

We know that left-handed users are struggling to find a good gaming mouse for them. Browsing gaming mouses online or at a local gaming store, it may be really difficult to find at least one mouse that will cover your gaming needs. But don’t worry, we found for you the best left-handed mouses on the market.

SteelSeries Sensei 310

SteelSeries Sensei 310, Wired Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 12000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 8
Ergonomic: Ambidextrous
Size: 125 x 70 x 38 mm
Weight: 92 g
Price:
$49.99

The Sensei 310 is an ambidextrous gaming mouse that SteelSeries hopes will win over professional gamers. It’s remarkably lightweight, comfortable to use and, most importantly, it performs excellently across all games and applications. Build quality isn’t the most luxurious in the hand, and the software is lagging behind key rivals.

The Sensei shares most of its DNA with the Rival 310 – and that’s no bad thing. There’s the same 12,000 DPI TrueMove optical sensor working under the hood, with similar build materials forming the ultra-light framework of the mouse. The Sensei differs in shape, though: SteelSeries has implemented an ambidextrous design that’s suitable for both left- and right-handed users.

The build materials create a solid yet feather-like physique, with the focus geared toward weight reduction. The Sensei 310 weighs a mere 92g. When it comes to tracking performance, the Sensei 310 is as good as it gets. Sharing the same 12,000 DPI sensor as the Rival 310 results in the same class-leading performance. Its smooth and elegant glide mirrors your intentions to a tee.

The SteelSeries Engine software powers customization options aboard the Sensei, and it’s very functional. You can adjust the DPI, change the button bindings and alter the RGB lighting.

Best Overall Gaming Mouse

The best gaming mice on our list is Logitech G502 Hero, which offers ergonomic grips, helpful extra buttons, intricate software packages and more. Whether you’re looking to enjoy immersive, single-player adventures or hone your skills on the tournament circuit, this mouse can fulfill all your needs. It’s worth investing in a good mouse to accompany you.

Logitech G502 Hero

Logitech G502 Hero, Wired Gaming Mouse

DPI: 100 – 16000
Sensor: Optical
Interface: USB
Buttons: 11
Ergonomic: Right-handed
Size: 131 x 75 x 41 mm
Weight: 121 g
Price:
$79.99

The new updated Logitech G502 hero keeps the design of yore but adds in a new sensor to keep up with gamers’ need for the best gaming mouse. At a starting price of $79,99, the Logitech G502 Hero gaming mouse hits a fair price point for a gaming mouse offering as much as it does.

The build combines matte black plastic for the primary buttons and grips and puts glossy plastic between the mouse’s aesthetically different sections and on the extra buttons. The matte plastic does a good job of exceeds, but the glossy plastic fares worse.

G502 Hero features customizable RGB lighting for the DPI indicators and Logitech G logo. Both lighting zones are smartly placed so they’re visible between your thumb and index finger when holding the mouse. By default, the DPI indicators don’t stay lit though.

The Logitech G502 Hero features the 1,000Hz polling rate and 1ms response time as expected from a proper gaming mouse, and we hardly notice any shortcomings in this department. But, the Hero sensor is what helps the mouse shine.

The Hero sensor offers flawless tracking from our experience with it. It supports a DPI range from 100 to 16,000, though we find the upper limit largely unimportant. What matters is how well it responds to our hand movements and how consistent it is. We never notice odd mouse movements. And, thanks to tracking at max speeds over 400 inches-per-second and max accelerations over 40Gs, it’ll be hard to push this mouse past its limit.

What to look for before you buy

When it comes to the decision of which gaming mouse should you buy, wired or wireless, it really goes down on the comfort and how it feels in your hand in general, based on the grips, the shape, and the buttons in your fingertips.

Right handed users can find a large amount of ergonomic mouses, online or at the local stores, with a lot of different designs and shapes. If you are left handed you should really go with something designed for ambidextrous usage as there are very few gaming mouses out there designed for left-handed users, like the ones we mentioned on our top list.

Wired or Wireless?

Well.. the truth about losing a bit of perfomance on a wireless mouse usage, it’s true. But that doesn’t mean it’s not the best choice for you. If you are not the “hardcore gamer” and looking for an all-purpose mouse, ready to go on your travels, and do some gaming, you should buy on of those! Wired gaming mouses don’t present as many delays as wireless ones, a lot more responsive, no batteries needed, and they are a lot cheeper.

Rainfelt
Music producer & Sound Designer from Greece. I make electronic music under the name Rainfelt.

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